Category: 2016

2016, Multimedia + Performance

Neglected

NICK DELLASANTA

In his print, Nick represents the seven neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) that, when left untreated, can result in crippling effects that limit productivity and thus encourage impoverishment. Broadspectrum medicines for NTDs can cost as little as fifty cents per person per year, yet there is still a critical need for these medicines in areas of limited access. Nick highlights that the medicines for NTDs are available and demonstrates that the major challenge is whether or not we will take the initiative to administer them to the people who sorely need them.

2016 THIRD PRIZE WINNER

 

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2016, Multimedia + Performance

Replication

ISABELLA GATTI

Isabella uses both acrylic painting and linoleum block-prints to look at the topic of cloning through a non-partisan lens. She believes in the the beauty of combining art and science in order to glean new perspectives and interpretations on both sides of an issue.

2016 SECOND PRIZE WINNER

 

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2016, Multimedia + Performance

Vitals

MARNIE KLEIN

In her dramatic piece, loosely based on the events of the 1984 Head Injury Experiments at the University of Pennsylvania and the ensuing controversy, Marnie investigates where we should draw the line between what is ethically permissible in scientific research and what is morally wrong. Through her characters, Marnie attempts to shed light on the complexity of the ethics of biomedical research.

2016 FIRST PRIZE WINNER



2016, Poster Presentation

Smokeless Tobacco Use Among Undergraduate Male College Students: Motivation for Use

SHANNON GLYNN

Shannon studies the motivation for smokeless tobacco use of undergraduate members of male-dominated organizations on college campuses. In particular, the study looks at whether motivation for participating in a male-dominated organization, perception of peer use of smokeless tobacco, and conformity to masculine norms are related to smokeless tobacco use.

2016, Poster Presentation

Something in the Water: The Confluence of Lead, Children’s Health, and Democracy in Flint, MI

ROSA CUPPARI + ANNA BUTTACI + ANDREW MESHNICK

Rosa, Anna, and Andrew explore the bioethical issues surrounding the water crisis in Flint, Michigan—looking first at the American Academy of Pediatrics’ position on the role of physicians as activists for the health of children, and second, at the intersection of poverty, health, and democracy, and how this intersection affects local communities.

Their analysis concluded that the children of Flint will need decades of health interventions to support them well into adulthood, and made recommendations for best practices to those operating in the public advocacy and medical industries.

2016 COMMENDATION

2016, Poster Presentation

College Students Can be the Key to America’s Organ Shortage

AMANDA FINNELL + HANNAH SMITH + KATHARINE MANGIALARDI

Amanda, Hannah, and Katharine analyze the increasing shortage of organ donations—responsible for up to 21 lost American lives per day and nearly 8,000 lives over the course of a year—to see if offering additional opportunities for college students to enroll as organ donors could function as a potential solution to this problem.

Their inquiry found primary ethical dilemmas surrounding organ transplantation arise from the shortage of available organs. Individuals are only actively solicited to become organ donors when they interact with the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).

They also concluded that there needs to be additional opportunities for organ donor enrollment to gain the organ donors needed to alleviate this organ shortage, adding that Georgetown University is currently working to institute a pilot program to pose this question to students. The results and effectiveness will be reported to national organ donation advocates with the intention to advance this potential solution nationally.

2016 FIRST PRIZE WINNER

2016, Policy Proposal + Business Plan

Efficient Transfer of Educationally Useful STEM Equipment from Federally Funded Universities to Public Schools

ALISHA DUA

Alisha highlights the negative implications of the severe deficit of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) professionals that the US is currently facing. Public education does not provide the tools necessary for students to maintain an interest in STEM subjects. She proposes a mandatory transfer of out-of-date, but still usable, STEM equipment from federally funded universities to public schools to provide the opportunity for public school students to deeply engage with STEM subjects.