View Past Submissions

View Past Submissions

2015, Multimedia + Performance

Welcome to 23andMe

OLJA BUSBAHER

Olja analyzes the marketing strategy of genomic sequencing company, 23andMe, to understand the role of rhetoric in explaining (or failing to explain) the potential risks and benefits of undergoing personal genome sequencing. Olja deconstructs the 23andMe starter kit, carefully dissecting the implications of 23andMe’s privacy statement.

 

4o7a1354

2015, Multimedia + Performance

geno(ME)

LENA BICHELL

Lena explores the relationship between every individual’s unique genetic code and the quest for greater knowledge of the collective human genome. Lena offers an interactive art piece that allows participants to build their own simplified DNA double helix, and then challenges participants to “donate” their unique genome to the larger effort toward understanding genomics on a broader scale.

 

4o7a1389

2015, Multimedia + Performance

Dilemma

VALERIA BALZA

Valeria presents five photographs that underscore the tension between the potential risks and benefits of personal genomic sequencing. Valeria’s work illuminates the dilemmic nature of undergoing genomic sequencing, as individuals must consider the implications of their genetic results.

 

4o7a1362

2015, Multimedia + Performance

“Liberty and Justice for All”: A Reflection

MARNIE KLEIN

Marnie Klein (NHS’18) first encountered the now-infamous Guatemala STD Experiments (1946-1948) in a class on bioethics with KIE Scholar Tom Beauchamp. American physicians intentionally infected a variety of vulnerable populations — prisoners, mental patients, prostitutes, orphans, school children — with sexually transmitted diseases without informed consent.

Klein explains, “While many subjects were treated with antibiotics, many were not, resulting in at least eighty deaths and countless infections both inside the study and in the larger population.”

Her multimedia piece vividly evokes the experiences of four victims of these experiments: a sex worker, a prisoner, an orphaned child, and a soldier, whose differing backgrounds raise intersecting and divergent moral dimensions of the case.

“Art allows us to talk about things that otherwise make us uncomfortable,” says Klein, “[making] bioethics tangible through stories.”

2015 FIRST PRIZE WINNER

 

2016, Multimedia + Performance

Neglected

NICK DELLASANTA

In his print, Nick represents the seven neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) that, when left untreated, can result in crippling effects that limit productivity and thus encourage impoverishment. Broadspectrum medicines for NTDs can cost as little as fifty cents per person per year, yet there is still a critical need for these medicines in areas of limited access. Nick highlights that the medicines for NTDs are available and demonstrates that the major challenge is whether or not we will take the initiative to administer them to the people who sorely need them.

2016 THIRD PRIZE WINNER

 

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2016, Multimedia + Performance

Replication

ISABELLA GATTI

Isabella uses both acrylic painting and linoleum block-prints to look at the topic of cloning through a non-partisan lens. She believes in the the beauty of combining art and science in order to glean new perspectives and interpretations on both sides of an issue.

2016 SECOND PRIZE WINNER

 

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2016, Multimedia + Performance

Vitals

MARNIE KLEIN

In her dramatic piece, loosely based on the events of the 1984 Head Injury Experiments at the University of Pennsylvania and the ensuing controversy, Marnie investigates where we should draw the line between what is ethically permissible in scientific research and what is morally wrong. Through her characters, Marnie attempts to shed light on the complexity of the ethics of biomedical research.

2016 FIRST PRIZE WINNER