Submission Guidelines

Submissions are closed for 2017.

Please check back again in early 2018 for submission guidelines for the 2018 Showcase. The guidelines below refer to the 2017 cohort.


BEFORE YOU SUBMIT

Check out prior years’ submissions to get a good idea of what our judges are looking for.

Consider signing up for our mailing list to be reminded of approaching deadlines, emailing the Showcase team to request to be paired with a faculty mentor, or requesting a one-on-one consultation with the staff of Georgetown’s Bioethics Research Library specifically designed to guide creative undergraduate scholarship.

Ready to go? Scroll down to review general submission guidelines, jump to those that apply specifically to your category, and view general judging criteria below.


GENERAL SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Only students who are current Georgetown undergraduates may submit projects to the Bioethics Research Showcase.

All submissions must include a 300 word abstract or artist’s statement that describes the work and its connection to bioethics.

The deadline for submissions in all formats is March 27, 2017 at 5:00 pm, via our online submission form.

Please note that submissions in the multimedia and performance categories must be accompanied by a video or audio recording of the project for judges to review. This should be uploaded to a public streaming service (YouTube, Vimeo, SoundCloud) and the URL provided as part of the final submission.


CATEGORY-SPECIFIC SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Be sure to consult the guidelines relevant to your category. In addition to specifying further criteria, these guidelines also contain resources to further assist in preparing your scholarship.

Jump to:


Academic Paper

Academic papers should be:

  • double-spaced;
  • between 7-15 pages (1750-3750 words) in length.

CONTENT

  • Follow the academic traditions of your field in terms of content and style of writing, since the goal is that you should be able to submit this paper to an undergraduate journal in your field.
  • Use guidelines for content and style of writing appropriate to the academic discipline in which you are working.

REFERENCES

  • Please acknowledge any sources that you used for research, especially those from which you quote.
  • References should be provided using the reference format appropriate to your field.

Lauinger Library offers citation tools here.


Business Plan

Business plans should be no more than 25 pages and include:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Clearly state and explain the bioethics issue or concern to which you are responding should provide a high level overview and summary of your plan to address the issue.

EXPERTISE

State the particular knowledge, skills, ability that you offer to meet the challenge if you are assembling a team to meet the challenge, be sure to list the knowledge assets each person on the team brings to the challenge.

SITUATION ANALYSIS OR MARKET ANALYSIS

Show that you have researched what has been done before to meet the challenge and what the strengths and weaknesses of those earlier efforts were should state what strategies you will use to address and move beyond these imperfect solutions.

FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS

Provide a careful statement and explanation of the costs of your proposed approach to the bioethics issue or problem should also indicate how those funding dollars can be acquired. If you are proposing to use government (federal or state) funds or to reallocate government (federal or state) funds, please describe a realistic approach to this budget and explain why you think the government ought to and will make that allocation.

APPENDIX

Add any additional supporting documents or explanations.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

List sources used in research and in creating business plan use the reference format appropriate to your field.


Policy Proposal

Policy proposals should include the following sections:

  • To [Policy Proposals may be addressed to multiple individual persons, and multiple institutions  and organizations]
  • From [student name]
  • Re [subject matter]
  • Date
  • Policy Proposal Sections:
  • Recommendation(s)/Call to Action
  • Brief Statement of problem
  • Rationale for Policy Recommendation [explanation based on ethical/ scientific/ political/ social/ legislative/ cultural grounds]
  • Background Information and Policy Implications
  • Background of Problem
  • Relevant Stakeholders and Perspectives
  • Legislative Context
  • Overview of Pros and Cons and Ramifications

Poster Presentation

Posters submitted to the Bioethics Showcase should:

  • be printed at 2 x 3 feet (only size accepted);
  • include a bioethics issue background section of no more than 250 words: a clear statement of the ethical issue you investigated, your purpose in undertaking the research, the methods you used (literature review, interviews, lab research, experiential learning, etc.), and a summary of your findings or results in sufficient detail to support the conclusions to which you came;
  • include a conclusions section: clearly identify the conclusions at which you arrived based on your research;
  • list no more than 5 references and use the reference format appropriate to your discipline.

All submissions must also follow the General Submission Guidelines.

RESOURCES

For tips on creating excellent posters, please look at this. Read especially sections on Dos and Don’ts, Adding Bits of Flair, Presenting the Poster, and Useful Literature.

SUBMITTING YOUR POSTER

There are two steps to the process for final submission: submitting your poster file to the Showcase judges, and printing your poster for display in the Showcase exhibition.

Submit your file: Complete a submission form and submit your poster file (.pdf or .pptx) no later than 5pm on March 27th. Showcase judges will review this file.

Print your poster: Students may print their posters at no cost at Georgetown’s Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS) in Car Barn 314:

  1. Contact Ms. Caitlin Crafton, Administrative Coordinator at Georgetown’s Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS) by email at coc29@georgetown.edu if you wish to print your poster. In your email tell Ms. Crafton that you are printing a poster for the Bioethics Research Showcase. Indicate the time that you could like to come print the poster. All students who wish to print posters via CNDLS must have their files to Ms. Crafton no later than April 1.
  2. Poster printing is available from Monday through Friday, 9 am to 5 pm. Allow 30 minutes for the entire process, which includes about 10 minutes for the actual printing of the poster.
  3. Wait for email confirmation that your requested time is available from Ms. Crafton.
  4. Take your poster on a flash drive in both .pptx format and .pdf format (as a backup) to the CNDLS Offices at Car Barn Suite 314. You will not be charged for printing.
  5. Ms. Crafton will show you where the printer is located and provide you with written instructions. You will be on your own to print the poster.
  6. Print your poster and bring the actual poster to front desk of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Healy Hall, 4th Floor by 5 pm on Friday, March 31, 2017 to be a part of the 2017 Showcase. The Institute is open Monday-Friday between 9 am and 5 pm.

Alternatively, you can print your poster through Lauinger Library’s Gelardin New Media Center. The cost is $20 for a 2 x 3 foot poster. Complete the “Poster Printing Submission Form.” Please note that the printing completion time typically is 2 business days (business days are Monday through Friday) but that turnaround time for completing a project depends on its size, complexity, and the volume of other requests. Don’t wait until the last minute.

Turnaround time for completing a project depends on its size, complexity, and the volume of other requests. Payment can be made by interdepartmental work tag number, cash, check, or credit card. Contact Laura Bishop, Ph.D., bishopl@georgetown.edu if you need assistance with the printing costs.

Complete a request form here.


Journalistic Reporting

Journalism articles should be double-spaced, and follow these length guidelines:

  • Op-Ed Pieces: 400-800 words
  • Articles: 800-1200 words
  • “Special Reports” (more like magazine articles): up to 2,000 words

All submissions must also follow the General Submission Guidelines.

JOURNALISM TIPS

Basic story structure

  • Intros/Ledes – a few different kinds.  The summary intro addresses the 5 Ws – Who?  What?  When?  Where?  Why?  The wrap intro pulls together several pieces of information about related events or themes.  It looks at the big picture.  The analysis intro states an argument or comes to a conclusion.  The feature intro is anecdotal or narrative and sets the scene.
  • Be sure that you answer the question, so what?  Assume the reader is new to the story, what is the context?  Is this a change in trend?  What is at stake? Explain why you are doing this story. [These questions are sometimes referred to as the “nut graph” in journalism.]
  • Sourcing – tell the reader how you know what you know and when you obtained the information.  Use quotes and data.
  • Quotes – should be used to add news analysis or color.  They should help move the story along.

Other things to think about

  • Grow the story – expand on the items, events, data, and themes in your intro sequentially.  Write subheadings to use as building blocks.  Focus on forward-looking analysis.
  • Reread for accuracy and fairness

Criteria adapted from the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Reuters.

For more information on reporting and writing basics, go here.


Multimedia + Performing Arts

This category is intended to permit a wide range of creative submissions from those using digital media (videos, interactive online experiences) and traditional media (painting, sculpture, interactive installation), to those involving live performance (music, dance, acting) or spoken word (poetry, prose, monologue), to others not listed here.

Please note that submissions in the multimedia and performance categories must be accompanied by a video recording of the project for judges to review. This should be uploaded to YouTube or another public video streaming service – as a private video – and the URL provided as part of the final submission. You do not need to upload a multimedia file so long as your submitted URL features your full submission.

Video submissions to the Bioethics Showcase may:

  • have a maximum runtime of 5 minutes;
  • take any form (documentary, narrative, animated, experimental, etc.).

Submitters are responsible for obtaining permissions to use any copyrighted images; to avoid copyright issues, it is highly recommended that all non-original material used have a creative commons license or be in the public domain.

All submissions must also follow the General Submission Guidelines.

CAMPUS RESOURCES

For possible topics, visit the Sloan Science & Film: Museum of the Moving Image and take a look at the student video shorts or the reviews of films that integrate science.

Students may also benefit from working with staff in the Gelardin New Media Center, 1st Floor of Lauinger Library.  Gelardin has expert staff with practical knowledge of video planning and production.

Students who have connections with the Department of Performing Arts, the Department of Art and Art History, or the Film and Media Studies Minor may benefit from working with one of their professors in that department.

The Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions holds a variety of collections related to medical treatment and health care. The archival collections include photographic and moving images, and personal papers and materials.

The National Library of Medicine History of Medicine Collection contains a vast array of resources related to medical history. You can search the variety of resources including historical films and videos, as well as an extensive image collection.


Creative Writing + Literary Analysis

This category includes a wide range of literary submissions, including forms of poetry and  prose forms of writing such as point-of-view pieces or literary analysis of a written work (fiction or non-fiction) or creative writing.

Students should follow the standards from their academic discipline and/or the directions of the creative muse.

All submissions must also follow the General Submission Guidelines.

RESOURCES

Examples of poetry focusing on bioethics issues may be drawn from the pages of JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) and its regular Poetry and Medicine feature; some examples for point-of-view submissions in a similar vein can be found in JAMA’s “Piece of My Mind” columns.

These pieces are typically based on personal experiences in the healthcare setting. Georgetown students might draw on internships, study abroad semesters, or volunteer work as the basis for their submissions.


Rhetoric + Argumentation Guidelines

This category includes ethics case analyses, debate statements, and other forms of persuasive speech. Submissions should:

  • be double-spaced;
  • be between 5-10 pages (1250-2500 words) in length;
  • take an explicit point of view on the issue or topic;
  • support that point of view by argumentation and/or supporting evidence.

CONTENT

  • Follow the academic traditions of your field in terms of content and style of writing, since the goal is that you should be able to submit this paper to an undergraduate journal in your field.
  • Use guidelines for content and style of writing appropriate to the academic discipline in which you are working.

REFERENCES

  • Please acknowledge any sources that you used for research, especially those from which you quote.
  • References should be provided using the reference format appropriate to your field.

Lauinger Library offers citation tools here.


Judging Criteria

Submissions will be judged on four basic elements that together reflect a student submission’s potential to add to, challenge, or otherwise broaden existing thought in bioethics: clarity and quality of presentation, critical analysis and contextualization of the work, originality, and effective engagement.

CLARITY + QUALITY OF PRESENTATION

Will be assessed on a number of factors: was the goal/purpose/hypothesis/plan for the research clearly stated or described? is the writing/presentation of the project organized and understandable? do the conclusions follow from the research findings presented?

For creative submissions: the assessment of clarity or quality will draw on 1) the student’s artist’s statement,  2) the final submitted work, and 3) the relationship between the two — is the goal/purpose/hypothesis/plan clearly described in the artist’s statement? how well is the goal achieved in the creative work? do the creative design, composition, technique support the artist’s goal?

CRITICAL ANALYSIS + CONTEXTUALIZATION

Is there evidence of critical thinking about the issue? has the student thoughtfully assessed existing scholarship? has the student included views or information about aspects of the issue that have been neglected previously? does the student place his/her work within the larger context of existing academic research or artistic exploration?

ORIGINALITY

May take many forms; students might focus on one type — all forms certainly are not required in any one submission. Some considerations regarding originality include: does the student employ novel methods? analyze original sources? develop a fresh presentation style? offer an innovative framing of the issue? propose new approaches? present new ideas? offer unexpected comparisons or contrasts?, include new information about an issue?, etc.

EFFECTIVE ENGAGEMENT

Depending on the medium: is the presentation visually pleasing? does the writing engage the reader? does the submission encourage personal reflection in the reader/viewer? does the piece create an emotional response? is the work thought-provoking?


Ready to submit?